Australian High Commission
Kingdom of Tonga

UNDP Community Resilience Grants Opportunity

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

Governance for Resilient Development in the Pacific (Gov4Res) - Community Resilience Small Grants Initiative – 2021

 

Introduction

The UNDP Gov4Res Project Community Resilience Small Grants Initiative will provide funding and technical support to for the design and implementation of resilient community projects.

Background

Communities in the Pacific are working together to develop and provide a better life for their people. While much progress has been made, these communities still face considerable economic and social development challenges. These challenges are further exacerbated by the impacts of climate change and disasters, setting back years of development gains. Sustainability of development can be enhanced if risks from climate change and disasters are addressed and gender and social inclusion needs are considered. Investment is needed to ensure that development is more sustainable by systematically considering risks and ensuring that the voices of diverse groups are heard in all development decision making. This is called risk informed development.

With funding support from the Australian Government’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA), the New Zealand’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT), and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA); UNDP is implementing the Gov4Res Project which works with countries across the Pacific region to risk-inform development. The three main Outcomes of this project are: 1) ensuring government planning and financing systems enable gender and socially inclusive risk-informed development; 2) country oversight and accountability systems require gender and socially inclusive risk-informed development; and 3) regional organisations, policies and practices are actively supporting gender and socially inclusive risk-informed development.

Purpose of the Initiative

The primary purpose of the Small Grants initiative is to fund community development projects that have a high development impact and are aligned to government priorities. An integral component of this initiative is the integration of risks to ensure that projects address climate and disaster risks and have gender and social inclusion considerations at their core. This is in line with UNDP’s Low Value Grants modality, which aims to strengthen institutional capacities, support community-based initiatives and support CSOs/NGOs involved in addressing climate change actions and gender equality activities.

Collaboration with local and subnational government in the identification, design and delivery of projects will be strongly encouraged, for instance identification of projects through formal government planning processes. This way, the community can work closely with sub-national and/or local government to ensure solutions and best practices can be replicated and scaled in other communities. Applicants are encouraged to demonstrate that the priorities being addressed have come through the local/sub-national development planning process and that diverse groups within communities contributed their expertise to identifying these priorities. The Small Grant Initiative is open to seven countries in the Pacific in this round with more countries in subsequent calls. Eligible countries to apply includes: Fiji, Kiribati, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.

Areas of Intervention

Funds will be allocated to applicants whose projects address one or more of the priorities explained below (in addition to meeting quality criteria and other conditions):

Promoting resilience in agriculture and food security projects – includes projects that address livelihood priorities and projects that will diversify sources of income for communities. Projects will need to show that potential climate change and disaster risks have been identified and managed as part of their design, that they benefit needs and promote participation of diverse members of communities and that they are not exacerbating risks in communities. For example, ensuring that farms are not located in a floodplain, using resilient cropping techniques, irrigation systems or climate resilient seeds.

Promoting resilience in community water resource management projects – in many communities, access to safe and clean water is a priority. Projects will have to present water solutions that would benefit the community, and the needs and priorities of diverse groups within communities. Projects will need to show that potential climate change and disaster risks have been identified and managed as part of their design, that they benefit needs and promote participation of diverse members of communities and that they are not exacerbating risks in communities. This may include consideration of the location of the water-infrastructure, the materials used to construct, or ensuring that the project is maintained and sustainable.

Promoting resilience in public-health and sanitation projects – includes community projects that enhance hygiene and sanitation solutions in communities. Projects will need to show that potential climate change and disaster risks have been identified and managed as part of their design, that they benefit needs and promote participation of diverse members of communities and that they are not exacerbating risks in communities. This may include consideration of the location of the infrastructure, the materials used to construct, or ensuring that the project is maintained and sustainable.

Promoting resilience in community energy projects – includes projects that enhance access to efficient and sustainable energy. Projects will need to show that potential climate change and disaster risks have been identified and managed as part of their design, that they benefit needs and promote participation of diverse members of communities and that they are not exacerbating risks in communities. This can include the energy source, the materials used to construct, or ensuring that the project is maintained and sustainable.

Promoting resilience in small-scale infrastructure projects – includes community projects that contribute to equitable social and economic development of the community. These may include projects that enhance access to education for marginalised groups, that enhance community access, or other priority needs. Projects will need to show that potential climate change and disaster risks have been identified and managed as part of their design, that they benefit needs and promote participation of diverse members of communities and that they are not exacerbating risks in communities. This may include consideration of the location of the water-infrastructure, the materials used to construct, or ensuring that the project is maintained and sustainable.

The Project Concepts should clearly demonstrate the overall objective of the project, how it will be delivered and who it will impact. Particular attention will be paid to the sustainability of proposed activities. Central to all the submissions is the articulation of an inclusive and participatory process that promotes gender equality and is socially inclusive. Applicants who demonstrate opportunities for supporting the leadership of women, youth, people with disabilities leadership throughout the design and implementation process will be viewed favourably. 

Applicants are to state their contributions (either in labour, materials, partnerships or cash) to enhance the projects impacts to the community.

Who Can Apply?

  • Registered CSOs and NGOs in the Pacific region that are either involved in community development in one or more of the areas of interventions or are interested in integrating this approach into their existing development/community programmes.
  • Community Based Organisations (for example: youth groups, women’s groups, disabled persons organisations, religious groups, as well as social enterprises) that are involved in community development, are encouraged to apply with a letter of support from local/subnational government partner or registered CSOs and NGOs
  • Consortia of CSO/NGO/CBO are also encouraged to apply (for example: registered CSO/NGO can partner with a CBO where the impact is more sustained).
  • Applicants are encouraged to submit their letters of partnership with local/subnational government stakeholders, CSO/NGO partners, government gender machinery and government agencies responsible for climate change and disaster risk management. Selected applicants might be required to submit support letters from partner public agencies. Land access/ title rights may also need to be submitted where applicable.

How much?

The Community Resilience Small Grants Incubator offers grants from USD5,000 to  USD30,000 per project depending on criteria of selection, management arrangements in place and experience of applicants.

How to Apply?

  1. Fill out the 3-page Grant Project Concept Paper , which inlcudes a Project Budget (Annex B via the link below). Please note that there will be information sessions organized for those that would like to know more information about the call. 
  2. Include the CVs of lead implementing staff
  3. Please send 1 & 2 above electronically in one file (pdf format) signed and scanned to the following email: [email protected] before 16th September. If additional clarifications required, questions can be sent to the same email address indicated above. Answers to questions will be provided within two working days, and will be posted for the benefit of all applicants.
Annex B: Project Concept Form